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2017 - 2018

Programming

Edith Brunette
from September 1st 2017 to December 31st 2017

MOMENTA | Biennale de l’image, Valérie Mréjen
from September 8th 2017 to October 21st 2017

MOMENTA | Biennale de l’image, Melik Ohanian
from September 8th 2017 to October 21st 2017

Caroline Mauxion
from November 11th 2017 to December 16th 2017

Teja Gavankar
from November 11th 2017 to December 16th 2017

Caroline Mauxion
le November 22nd 2017

Teja Gavankar
le November 26th 2017

Artiste à l'école
from December 12th 2017 to December 16th 2017

Bertille Bak
Lisa Jackson
Yoshua Okón
Helen Reed
May Truong
Commissaire | Curator: Zoë Chan

from January 20th 2018 to March 17th 2018

Raymonde April, Jessica Auer, Jacques Bellavance, Velibor Božović, Gwynne Fulton, Katie Jung, Jinyoung Kim, Lise Latreille, Celia Perrin Sidarous, Marie-Christine Simard, Bogdan Stoica, Andrea Szilasi, Chih-Chien Wang
from April 14th 2018 to June 16th 2018




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Edith Brunette, 2016

Edith Brunette
from September 1st 2017 to December 31st 2017

In partnership with OPTICA, artist Edith Brunette will undertake a documentation and art intervention project during the coming year in which she attempts to bring the worlds of art and multimedia closer together. This project falls in line with the artist’s ongoing focus on the economy of the art milieu.


Edith Brunette blends her art practice with theoretical research. Concerned with the discourses at work in the arts and with the political forces and power relationships they reveal, her recent projects have dealt, among other things, with video surveillance (Caméraroman, 2011), speaking out in times of social crisis (Consensus, 2012) and artists’ political agency (Faut-il se couper la langue?, 2013; Cuts Make the Country Better, 2015, in collaboration with François Lemieux).


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Valérie Mréjen, Leur histoire, 2014.
Vidéo HD, couleur, son, 3 minutes 30 secondes (en boucle)
Collection LVMH
Crédit : Paul Litherland

MOMENTA | Biennale de l’image, Valérie Mréjen
from September 8th 2017 to October 21st 2017
What Does the Image Stand For?

Guest Curator: Ami Barak

MOMENTA | Biennale de l’image (formely Le Mois de la Photo à Montréal) presents, in collaboration with OPTICA, Valérie Mréjen –Q&R – Q&A from September 8th to October 21st. The opening is being held on September 8th at 7:30pm, in the presence of the artist.

Valérie Mréjen’s (France) moving and still images are inspired by personal memories, commonplace ideas, and misunderstandings. The exchanges taking place in her works, loaded with intensity, transform banal situations into existential metaphors. In Leur histoire (2014), two people seated at a restaurant table chat. Their conversation is punctuated by images collected elsewhere, as if these images could put some order in their relationship. In Déshabillé (2017), six characters evoke memories and personal stories related to clothing. In this situation the clothes make the man; it is appearance that reveals the characters’ psychological complexity. In La Baule, ciel d’orage (2016), the candour of the life stories and exchanges leaves room for a poetry of the everyday, an aesthetic of the refrain, in which such beings become innocent and touching heroes who easily inspire our affection.

MOMENTA 2017

For its 15th edition, MOMENTA has joined forces with curator Ami Barak, who has developed an outstanding program on the theme What Does the Image Stand For? The 2017 edition of MOMENTA explores the concept of photographic and videographic evidence for the prosecution, whether images are still or in motion, raising the question of images as avatars, and focusing on the fantastical and sublimated aspects of the reality that they convey. The 38 artists in this biennale invite us not to accept their testimony uncritically. The biennale comprises three segments. The first, which corresponds to the central exhibition at our headquarters, focuses on the work of 23 artists and is being presented at two sites: Galerie de l’UQAM and VOX, centre de l’image contemporaine. The second consists of 14 solo exhibitions spread throughout the city. And the third is an exhibition of documents located at Artexte. MOMENTA is also a vast program of public activities, talks, projections, and encounters, as well as many opportunities to meet the artists and see their works. The biennale would be incomplete without its catalogue, co-produced with the prestigious publishing house Kerber Verlag, which brings together texts by the curator and five authors who address the question What Does the Image Stand For?


EVENTS SURROUNDING THE EXHIBITIONS MOMENTA

Discussions and Talks


Day of discussion with artists of the Biennale

September, 9
10 AM to 12 PM

Maison Shaughnessy, Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA)
1920 Baile Street, Montreal

Morning session
Erin Shirreff
Jayce Salloum
Nelson Henricks
Jonas St. Michael
Valérie Mréjen

Sujets a: desire — appeals

Sujets a alludes to a central concept animating Ami Barak’s curatorial theme: Jacques Lacan’s objet a. This series of discussions draws Lacan’s concept into a space for conversation, where the public is invited to engage with many artists in the biennale and reflect on some of the motivations behind their work.

Talk and signature session with Valérie Mréjen

September 9,
2 PM to 3 PM 30

Librairie Euguelionne
1426, Beaudry street, Montreal

On the occasion of the publication of Troisième personne, Valérie Mréjen will take part of a public discussion with Marie-Ève Blais, bookseller at librairie l'Euguélionne. The event will be follow by a signature session.
Mix and Match Tour

A Mix and Match Tour combining a guided tour of the exhibitions at Optica and Centre CLARK takes place on September 23 at 12 PM 30.

Screening nights at Cinémathèque québécoise

A screening night presenting a selection of the artist’s works takes place on September 27 at 7 PM.

So you won’t miss anything in the 2017 edition, a detailed program is available for free at all of our exhibition partners and on momentabiennale.com.

Providing access to all biennale activities, MOMENTA Passports are available at La Vitrine box office (online: lavitrine.com).

About MOMENTA

For nearly 30 years, Le Mois de la Photo à Montréal has been offering a stimulating framework within which to study current practices, evolutions, and issues associated with the still and moving image in Western culture, and to take the pulse of trends in contemporary image making. Renamed MOMENTA | Biennale de l’image in 2017, the organization plays a crucial role in the local, national, and international ecology of the visual arts community. Through its curatorial approach, renowned guest curators develop rigorous artistic programming based on relevant themes; the biennale enjoys a well-established reputation in its city and country, as well as abroad. It actively contributes to the recognition of Canadian artists – who comprise more than 50% of the artists in each edition – by presenting their work within an international context, in association with 15 exhibition partners. In 7 editions, the organization has exhibited more than 2,000 works by 400 artists, and welcomed almost 22 million visitors.

COMMUNIQUÉ DE PRESSE (pdf)



Valérie Mréjen (1969–) is a French artist, filmmaker, and novelist who lives and works in Paris. A graduate of the Paris-Cergy National Graduate School of Art, she has always been interested in different means of expression as ways of exploring the potential of language. She draws her inspiration from accounts of real-life experiences, which she rewrites and stages. She launched her art career with a number of artist’s books, before turning to video. In 2008, her work was featured in a solo exhibition, La place de la concorde, held at the Jeu de Paume Museum (Paris). She has also done many short films, documentaries (Pork and Milk, 2004; Valvert, 2008), and, co-directed with Bertrand Schefer, a full-length film titled En ville (Quinzaine des réalisateurs, Cannes, 2011). She published Mon grand-père (1999), L’Agrume (2001) with Les éditions Allia, and Forêt noire (2012) and Troisième personne (2017) with Les éditions P.O.L. She is represented by Galerie Anne-Sarah Bénichou (Paris).




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Melik Ohanian
Portrait of Duration, 2015.
Sept photographies sur Duratrans, boîtes lumineuses, animation Arduino, 1 seconde, 105 x 90 x 10 cm chaque
Collection Pomeranz
Crédit : Paul Litherland


MOMENTA | Biennale de l’image, Melik Ohanian
from September 8th 2017 to October 21st 2017
What Does the Image Stand For?

Guest Curator: Ami Barak

MOMENTA | Biennale de l’image (formerly Le Mois de la Photo à Montréal) presents, in collaboration with OPTICA, Melik Ohanian – Portrait of Duration. L’instant S from September 8th to October 21st. The opening is being held on September 8th at 7:30pm, in attendance of the artist.

Melik Ohanian (France) explores the relationships between science, astrophysics, and the visual arts. In Portrait of Duration (2015), he reveals the change of state of cesium 133, the chemical element that defines the universal second in atomic clocks through its transition from solid to liquid state. Ohanian invites the viewer to experience a representation of time itself. Portrait of Duration – Expand Series (2015/2017) is composed of large scale images excerpted from the experiments conducted for Portrait of Duration. Each photograph proposes a figure of time. The Post-Image series (2014) is made from media content culled from the international press, meticulously torn to pieces by the artist. This gesture questions the nature, circulation, and reproduction of images in the present era.

MOMENTA 2017

For its 15th edition, MOMENTA has joined forces with curator Ami Barak, who has developed an outstanding program on the theme What Does the Image Stand For? The 2017 edition of MOMENTA explores the concept of photographic and videographic evidence for the prosecution, whether images are still or in motion, raising the question of images as avatars, and focusing on the fantastical and sublimated aspects of the reality that they convey. The 38 artists in this biennale invite us not to accept their testimony uncritically. The biennale comprises three segments. The first, which corresponds to the central exhibition at our headquarters, focuses on the work of 23 artists and is being presented at two sites: Galerie de l’UQAM and VOX, centre de l’image contemporaine. The second consists of 14 solo exhibitions spread throughout the city. And the third is an exhibition of documents located at Artexte.

MOMENTA is also a vast program of public activities, talks, projections, and encounters, as well as many opportunities to meet the artists and see their works. The biennale would be incomplete without its catalogue, co-produced with the prestigious publishing house Kerber Verlag, which brings together texts by the curator and five authors who address the question What Does the Image Stand For?

Mix and Match Tour

A Mix and Match Tour combining a guided tour of the exhibitions at Optica and Centre CLARK takes place on September 23 at 12:30pm.

So you won’t miss anything in the 2017 edition, a detailed program is available for free at all of our exhibition partners and on momentabiennale.com.

Providing access to all biennale activities, MOMENTA Passports are available at La Vitrine box office (online: lavitrine.com).

About MOMENTA

For nearly 30 years, Le Mois de la Photo à Montréal has been offering a stimulating framework within which to study current practices, evolutions, and issues associated with the still and moving image in Western culture, and to take the pulse of trends in contemporary image making. Renamed MOMENTA | Biennale de l’image in 2017, the organization plays a crucial role in the local, national, and international ecology of the visual arts community. Through its curatorial approach, renowned guest curators develop rigorous artistic programming based on relevant themes; the biennale enjoys a well-established reputation in its city and country, as well as abroad. It actively contributes to the recognition of Canadian artists – who comprise more than 50% of the artists in each edition – by presenting their work within an international context, in association with 15 exhibition partners. In 7 editions, the organization has exhibited more than 2,000 works by 400 artists, and welcomed almost 22 million visitors.

PRESS RELEASE(pdf)



Melik Ohanian (1969–) is a French artist of Armenian origin who lives and works in Paris and New York. His work, which focuses on the question of time, borrows procedures and devices from cinema and projection technique to explore the relationships between science, astrophysics, and the visual arts. His most recent solo exhibitions include Under Shadows at the Centre Georges- Pompidou (Paris, 2016) and DAYS, I See what I Saw and what I will See at Art Basel (2015). His work has also been featured in group exhibitions, such as Dreamlands, Whitney Museum of American Art (New York, 2016); Les Rencontres d’Arles (2016); the 20th Sydney Biennale (2016); and the 56th Venice Biennale (2015), for which the Armenian pavilion, where his work was exhibited, won the Golden Lion award for the best national pavilion. Ohanian was awarded the Marcel Duchamp Prize in 2015. He is represented by Galerie Chantal Crousel (Paris) and the Dvir Gallery (Tel Aviv, Brussels).




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Caroline Mauxion, Une enveloppe sans contours, 2017. Impression sur verre trempé, 76, 2 x 152, 4 cm. | Print on toughened glass, 76, 2 x 152, 4 cm. Avec l'aimable permission de l'artiste | Courtesy of the artist

Caroline Mauxion
from November 11th 2017 to December 16th 2017

“There is the puddle,’ said Rhoda, ‘and I cannot cross it. I hear the rush of the great grindstone within an inch of my head. Its wind roars in my face. All palpable forms of life have failed me. Unless I can stretch and touch something hard, I shall be blown down the eternal corridors for ever. What, then, can I touch? What brick, what stone? and so draw myself across the enormous gulf into my body safely?”

Virginia Woolf, The Waves

Rather than engaging in the practice of the photographic image, Caroline Mauxion explains that her work consists of practising the photographic image. The nuance is critical, as it reassociates photography with the idea of action and it emphasizes both the performativity of the image and its materiality, for which notions of contact and movement are essential. Mauxion’s images are thus to be seen as testing the limits of the visible and invisible, of transparency and opacity, of abstraction and figuration, of shadow and light.

The work presented at OPTICA is inspired by the originating conditions of photography. Through photographic procedures, which imprint intensities of light onto photosensitive surfaces, distinct materials become closely related. The sheet of cracked glass and the water puddle are imagined geographies, constant returns to writings of Virginia Woolf. The description of spaces between the tangible and the intangible in Woolf’s novels and short stories serve as a guide in the artist’s creative process. The presented works become reinterpretations of recurring motifs in Woolfian imagery, endeavouring to make visible that which is hidden in the “cotton wool of daily life.”

If Mauxion practises photography, she also installs it. The glass plate, become photographic support, depends on its installation in the space to reveal the image; the white page on which the photograph would normally be printed is replaced by the white wall. Some images become nearly invisible. Many can be read in different ways. They invite physical movement. All are created upon contact.

Author: Daniel Fiset

Daniel Fiset is an art historian and educator. He lives and works in Montreal.

Public Discussion between Caroline Mauxion and Daniel Fiset at OPTICA, November 22, 2017 from 6:30 PM to 8 PM.



PRESS REVIEW



PRESS RELEASE (pdf)

Originally from France, Caroline Mauxion has been living in Montreal since 2010. She is the recipient of the Sylvie et Simon Blais Foundation’s Award for Emerging Visual Artists (2015). Her work has been shown in solo exhibitions in Montreal, at Galerie Les Territoires (2014) and Galerie Simon Blais (2015), and in Rimouski, at Centre d’artistes Caravansérail (2016). She will be undertaking a residency in Banff in 2018, under the auspices of the CALQ’s residency program


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Teja Gavankar, other’s spaces 002, 2016. Dessin, 21, 59 x 27, 94 cm. | Drawing, 21, 59 x 27, 94 cm. Avec l'aimable permission de l'artiste | Courtesy of the artist

Teja Gavankar
from November 11th 2017 to December 16th 2017

Indian artist Teja Gavankar’s field of investigation and action is the everyday and the transformation of space in its most mundane attributes. Her drawings and in situ interventions negotiate the territory’s modes of appearance, distilling its identity and extracting its specificities. She draws from constructed surroundings, made familiar through repeated experience, and teases out new configurations. While the artist has mainly produced site-specific projects in urban spaces, the work presented at OPTICA represents a first gallery production.

Interested in geometry and topologies, Gavankar revisits architectural elements—walls, floors, stairs, and recently, the corner motif—turning them into conditions for the emergence of an experience, seeking to break the tranquil poise of their functionality, structure, and particular characteristics. Yet, these very minimal artistic interventions, whether in two or three dimensions, generate an undeniable force. They manipulate little things, trivialities, in order to produce subtleties that bear great perceptual ambiguities.



PRESS RELEASE (pdf)

The artist’s drawing practice challenges the ruled grid, the paper support-tool that gives one’s stroke a Cartesian guidance and orientation. Many Indian artists have given critical attention to the means of describing, calculating, and measuring various manifestations of the world. Deployed in India during British occupation and associated with modernity and colonialism, these markers have enabled the classification and topology of both the natural and human resources found on the territory. Even if Gavantar, like other artists of India’s new creative generation, does not make direct historical references, her use of the grid remains critical nonetheless. It is a question of tackling restrictive structures and their demands. At times, she will blow the grid apart, favouring curved lines and offset, oblique strokes that run outside the rectilinear compartments or erasing some of the squares. Reinventing the line through such gestures, she brings suppleness to structural rigidity.

Author: Julie Alary Lavallée
Julie Alary Lavallée is a doctoral student in art history at Concordia University.
Her research concerns group shows by contemporary Indian artists in a diasporic context.

Public Presentation of Teja Gavankar at Darling Foundry The event is organised in partnership with the Darling Foundry, 745, Ottawa st., H2C 1R8. The talk will be held in English, while the conversation will be in French and English. Thursday, November 16, from 6 to 8 PM.

With an MFA from the Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda (India), Teja Gavankar has completed a number of residencies, including one in 2014 at Darling Foundry, Montreal (with the support of the Inlaks Shivdasani Foundation). In 2016, she took part in the Young Subcontinent exhibition (Serendipity Art Festival, India). She lives and works in Bombay.


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Discussion entre Caroline Mauxion et Daniel Fiset à OPTICA, 2017.
Photo : Esther Bourdages

Caroline Mauxion
November 22nd 2017
Public Talk

Part of her solo exhibition at OPTICA, une enveloppe sans contours, Caroline Mauxion will meet with Daniel Fiset in the form of a public talk. The activity takes place from 6:30 PM until 8 PM.



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Présentation de Teja Gavankar à la Fonderie Darling, 2017.
Photo : Hugo St-Laurent

Teja Gavankar
November 26th 2017
Public Talk of Teja Gavankar




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Carton d'invitation, 2017.
Photo : Marie-Laure Robitaille

Artiste à l'école
from December 12th 2017 to December 16th 2017

Opening on Tuesday December 12, 2017 from 5 pm to 6 pm




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Yoshua Okón, Pulpo [Octopus], 2011. Projection vidéo à 2 canaux, son, 17 minutes 12 secondes, seaux, épreuve chromogène, 49, 53 cm x 33,02 cm. | Pulpo [Octopus], 2011. 2-channel video projection, 17 minutes 12 secondes, buckets, chromogenic print, 49, 53 cm x 33,02 cm.
Avec l'aimable permission de l'artiste | Courtesy of the artist

Bertille Bak
Lisa Jackson
Yoshua Okón
Helen Reed
May Truong
Commissaire | Curator: Zoë Chan

from January 20th 2018 to March 17th 2018
Performing Lives

In the exhibition Performing Lives, curator Zoë Chan looks at video in which artists mix codes, drawing both from the informational nature of the documentary medium and the world of televised and cinematic spectacle. Focusing on various cultural groups—a Roma community in Paris, residential school survivors, Guatemalan migrant workers, Twin Peaks fans, and young women of Asian-Canadian background—these narrative works reflect on the representation of its subjects in ways that go beyond the conventional display of bodies typically associated with the documentary genre.




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Raymonde April, Portrait de groupe à la Société des plantes, 2014. Impression jet d’encre, 76,2 x 114, 3 cm. Avec l'aimable permission de l'artiste | Courtesy of the artist

Raymonde April, Jessica Auer, Jacques Bellavance, Velibor Božović, Gwynne Fulton, Katie Jung, Jinyoung Kim, Lise Latreille, Celia Perrin Sidarous, Marie-Christine Simard, Bogdan Stoica, Andrea Szilasi, Chih-Chien Wang
from April 14th 2018 to June 16th 2018

Outre-vie / Afterlife brings together pictorial artists who work separately together. Their point of departure is the “after-life” of the photographic image, considered as a material, as memory, as a trace, or as story. The group’s practices are hugely diverse, including observations of daily life, constructed fictions, storytelling, recordings, photography, video, writing, drawing, sound, and installations. Artists of Afterlife meet regularly, exchanging views around a dinner table or during working residencies outside Montreal. Often interested in the same subjects, they broach them from separate paths. Their group projects are infused with an intimate fellowship that gives rise to a stream of repetitions, variations, borrowings, and citations, echoing the fluidity of conversation and conjuring art-making as a simple, everyday gesture.