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2018 - 2019

Programming

Maryse Larivière
from September 7th 2018 to October 20th 2018

Paul Litherland, Monique Moumblow
from September 7th 2018 to October 20th 2018

Maryse Larivière
from October 13th 2018 to October 13th 2018

Paul Litherland, Monique Moumblow
from October 20th 2018 to October 20th 2018

Geneviève Chevalier
from November 10th 2018 to December 15th 2018

Virginie Laganière
from November 10th 2018 to December 15th 2018

Le Prisme, livre d'artiste de Virginie Laganière | The Prism, artist's book of Virginie Laganière
from November 10th 2018 to December 15th 2018

Bord d’attaque/ Bord de fuite, livre d'artiste de Geneviève Chevalier | Leading Edge/ Trailing Edge, artist's book of Geneviève Chevalier
from November 10th 2018 to December 15th 2018

Les Samedis ensemble en familles | Saturdays with the Family
from November 17th 2018 to December 15th 2018


from December 1st 2018 to December 1st 2018

Juan Ortiz-Apuy
from January 19th 2019 to March 16th 2019

Léa Moison
from January 19th 2019 to March 16th 2019

Théâtre d’ombres avec Pavitra Wickramansinghe | Shadows theater with Pavitra Wickramansinghe
from February 1st 2019 to April 30th 2019

Adam Basanta
from April 13th 2019 to June 15th 2019

Jo-Anne Balcaen
from April 13th 2019 to June 15th 2019




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Maryse Larivière, Under the Cave of Winds, 2017.
Film 16mm avec son, 4 minutes 3 secondes | 16mm film with sound, 4 minutes 3 secondes. Avec l'aimable permission de l'artiste | Courtesy of the artist

Maryse Larivière
from September 7th 2018 to October 20th 2018
Under the Cave of Winds

Opening, Friday, September 7 - 6PM

Family Saturdays: September 15 and October 20

In her poetry and in essays of an often fictionalized autobiographical nature, Maryse Larivière puts her own voice on the line by going beyond oppositions between affective lived experience and the symbolic construction of sexual difference. Under the guise of research in art history, Larivière also produces analyses of artistic practices of the 1970s-among them Joyce Wieland-that were contemporary with the emergence of women's writing in the literary field. The epistolary novel Orgazing, one component of her installation at OPTICA, Under the Cave of Winds, continues with her own practice of assembling referential fragments in a mix of stylistic modes (poetry, theory, autobiography). The action is set on Staffa Island, Scotland. From her cell at the top of Fingal’s Cave, the narrator writes letters to her lover, weaving an amorous discourse that places the auditory pleasures of language before recognition of one’s desire by the “other.” As readers, we adopt the role of the hypothetical—and apparently male—subject addressed by the author, while remaining a third party, outside the transference relationship. Yet the exhibition encourages transgressive gestures in the literary space by way of an intentionally inadequate “adaptation” of the book. Thus, a 16-mm film strings together narrative fragments drawn from a breakdown of this “source text.” The artist plays the figure of the captive author, though she avoids showing her face, while the craggy landscape and prison architecture make surreptitious appearances. Saturating the cinematic apparatus, the scene of the writing, and the space in which we are strolling, the sculptures act as hinges or pivots. Some have a dissimulative function, like the rock that hides the film projector and thus emits a single beam of light, while the back of the screen becomes a load-bearing structure for an absent parrot. Yet these apparently motionless markers also change shape during our visit. In the parallax, their configuration alludes at once to the translation process Larivière undertook in composing Orgazing (English not being her mother tongue) and to the fluid movements of the character’s psyche as she invents her own language, made up as much of words uttered as of air exhaled.

Author: Vincent Bonin

Vincent Bonin is a writer and curator. He lives in Montreal. He has recently published D’un discours qui ne serait pas du semblant/Actors, Networks, Theories, Dazibao, Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Montreal.

Public reading of the book Orgazing at OPTICA, Friday, September 7 - 7PM

Maryse Larivière, Orgazing, Calgary, Untitled Art Society, 2017, 64p.
Epistolary novella, prose and poetry
Available at OPTICA, 20$.

PRESS RELEASE (pdf)




Maryse Larivière is a researcher, author, and artist. She lives in Montreal. She has exhibited at Walter Philips Gallery, The Banff Centre, AB, Oakville Galleries, and galerie Division, in Montreal.




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Paul Litherland, Running, 1996.
Image tirée de la vidéo | Video Still | Photo: Deb VanSlet

Paul Litherland, Monique Moumblow
from September 7th 2018 to October 20th 2018

Opening, Friday, September 7, 6PM

Family Saturdays: September 15 and October 20

“It’s all life until death”
Grace Paley

The experiences we render into story are integral parts of who we become. Yet some stories remembered are more significant than others. These stories are often comprised of “vital memories” (Brown and Leavy) that recall a moment of drama or trauma in a life. Vital stories are not always coherent, or consistent. We may tell them slightly differently, only recall fragments, or embellish. Although we may share them with others, we may also repress or forget details over time.

47 Storeys is one such vital story. In 1996 Paul Litherland went to a bar at the top of a very tall building, drank a beer, waited until the other patrons and staff left, then parachuted into the night-time sky, landing safely on the street to the astonishment of two late-night revelers. Three months after the jump, afraid of forgetting significant details, Paul commemorated his adventure to video. 20 years later Paul revisits the event with Monique Moumblow. They re-edit the original 43 minute tape down to 11 minutes. Paul then attempts to re-enact his original mediated performance. On one screen we see Paul who sits, listens to himself through headphones, and speaks over his original narrative. On a second screen Paul attempts to duplicate his original performance word-for-word and gesture-by-gesture. On the third screen is the edited original. These three different renditions of the tale, from 3 different moments in time, are almost the same, but they never perfectly align. No matter how much we practice, the story is never exactly as it was.

47 Storeys is a brilliant and slightly comedic rendition of the “performative act of memory-making”(Kuhn). Narrating the past re-activates and catapults memories into the present, often with the help of souvenirs such as the video-tape and parachute equipment that Paul still keeps in his care. Paul’s fumbling narrative recollections lay bare this performative process of memory-making as past and present collide in a single temporal moment superbly visualized in this 3 channel video.

In the re-telling of this vital story grey-haired, bespectacled Paul moves in imperfect harmony with his former self. This temporal collision invites reflection upon both memory re-enactments, story-telling and the vagaries of ageing: “the permanently fluctuating relationships between younger and older selves” (Segal). We see, hear and feel these fluctuations, experiencing a vertigo of narrative mediation: Paul’s post-hoc memory is rendered into story and captured on video tape, which is then digitally remastered in the present for the future. It is the absence of documentation of the original event –no pictures, photos or go-pro video–that makes the re-telling of the story so necessary and so compelling. Thankfully, Paul lived to tell the tale, again and again.

Author: Kim Sawchuk

Kim Sawchuk est professeure et directrice de Ageing-Communication-Technologies (www.actproject.ca), Université Concordia.


Director: Monique Moumblow
Performer: Paul Litherland
Camera 1996 et 2016: Deb VanSlet
Performance Coach: Alexis O’Hara
Sound Mix: Steve Bates
Translation of the video: Jo-Anne Balcaen
Text: Kim Sawchuk
Video synchronizer: Nelson Henricks
Location: Maerin Hunting
Equipment Loan: Frederick Masson
Painting: Karen Elaine Spencer
Team at OPTICA: Esther Bourdages, Philippe Chevrette, Marie-Josée Lafortune
Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec
Concordia University Part-time Faculty Association
Nicole Gingras
Lorraine Oades
Yudi Sewraj
Karen Trask

Performance of Paul Litherland at OPTICA, Saturday, October 20, 2018
PRESS RELEASE (pdf)




Monique Moumblow is a video artist and a fan of spectacular storeys.

Paul Litherland is a gentleman adventurer, a closet scuba diver in a room full of wingsuiters.




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Maryse Larivière
from October 13th 2018 to October 13th 2018
Public reading of the book Orgazing at OPTICA

Friday, September 7 - 7PM and Saturday, October 13, at 3PM.
Maryse Larivière, Orgazing, Calgary, Untitled Art Society, 2017, 64p.
Epistolary novella, prose and poetry
Available at OPTICA, 20$.

Orgazing is an epistolary novella set on the remote Scottish island of Staffa. A woman, held captive in an institution built atop Fingal’s Cave, addresses her beloved about their failed revolution, her attempt to transform writing into telepathic singing, and her effort to develop this mode of communication while incarcerated. Shifting between prose and poetry, word and birdsong, Orgazing explores the limits of body and voice, articulating an unsettled longing for metamorphosis. The themes explored in the artist’s book Orgazing include the sinuous paths of feminine desire, the wandering fluxes of nature and culture, and the concerted and agential relationship between mind and body in the making and thinking of art.




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Paul Litherland, Monique Moumblow, 47 Storeys, 2018. Installation vidéo à 3 canaux, son, circa 10 min.
Paul Litherland, Monique Moumblow, 47 Storeys, 2018. Three-channel video installation, sound, circa 10 min.
Crédit | Credit: Paul Litherland.



Paul Litherland, Monique Moumblow
from October 20th 2018 to October 20th 2018

Next Saturday October 20th, performance of Paul Litherland from 4PM to 5PM_the artist completes the cycle!


As part of his exhibition at OPTICA in collaboration with Monique Moumblow, Paul Litherland presents a performance that sheds light around the jump.
Closing Performance - the complete story of the jump!!

Paul Litherland:"22 years ago, I jumped from a building without a camera, but with a parachute. A few months later, wanting to have some kind of document, I made a video recording of the story. 20 years later, I repeat the process. In collaboration with Monique Moumblow, we present the premiere of the work 47 Storeys, a video installation about memory, age, and technology".

Public live feed of Paul Litherland performance.


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Geneviève Chevalier, Bord d'attaque / Bord de fuite - Leading Edge / Trailing Edge, 2018.
Image tirée du carnet. Impression jet d'encre sur papier coton, 43,18 X 60,96 cm.
| Still from the booklet. Inkjet printing on cotton paper, 43,18 X 60,96 cm.
Avec l'aimable permission de l'artiste | Courtesy of the artist



Geneviève Chevalier
from November 10th 2018 to December 15th 2018
Leading Edge/ Trailing Edge

Opening, Saturday, November 10 - 3PM to 6PM

Family Saturdays: November 17 and December 15

Since the publication of J.J. Audubon’s Birds of America in 1838, bird populations have constantly decreased, for some to the point of extinction. They are now but paper memories and preserved bodies in natural history museums. Artist Geneviève Chevalier tracked one species that has acclimatized and adjusted remarkably well to climate change. The “fou de Bassan,” or Northern Gannet, chose to make its home on craggy cliffs of Bonaventure island, where its colony of 100,000 individuals faces some reproductive issues, and on Bass Rock, off the coast of Scotland, which has a more prosperous population. The Gannet succeeds where many other species have great difficulty enduring the impact of climate variations on food and water and air temperatures. Chevalier observed these specimens in their habitat and met with scholars in Quebec and Scotland. What she learned is reconstituted in a video diptych and artist book, the titles of which conjure a world of aeronautics.

This Anthropocene era, in which man has become the most powerful of disruptive geological forces, has ushered in the Sixth Extinction event. The previous one, in the Cretaceous period, had, among other things, eradicated the dinosaurs. But the most devastating, dubbed the Great Dying, took place at the end of the Permian period; it resembled the current one in that it, too, was due to climate changes. Humanity had no part to play in that extinction, which stretched over a long period. But today the problem is exponential. The artist observes its collateral damage on the seabirds. The impact of current civilizations on wild flora and fauna also requires adjustments in how extinct species are collected. Now even animals impacted by oil spills are worthy of conservation, according to Bob McGowan, curator of bird collections at Edinburgh, as he confides with the artist in a section of her book, an essential counterpoint to the film. What was the cause of death for these bodies meticulously labelled and preserved in environmentally controlled chambers? Chevalier’s film prompts as many questions as it provides answers. The remains still have something to say, despite their silence. The film, too, is overcome with silence, the loop coming full circle, though not quite the same. Experts’ voices start to fade, subtly reflecting the difficulty in being heard, an auditory attrition of ecosystems, an extinction that devastates animal populations. More than ever then, Bass Rock, which dominates the view in Leading Edge/ Trailing Edge, takes the appearance of a fortification, a bastion of resistence, an outcrop of stability in this environmental debacle.

Author: Bénédicte Ramade

Bénédicte Ramade is an art historian specialized in ecological questions. She is currently conducting research on the anthropocenization of knowledge and art practices. She is an independent curator and art critic and a lecturer at Université de Montréal.

Public conversation at OPTICA, Saturday, December 1st, 3 pm to 4:30 pm between Geneviève Chevalier, Bénédicte Ramade (Université de Montréal) and Kyle Elliott (McGill University).

PRESS RELEASE (pdf)


PRESS REVIEW

MAVRIKAKIS, Nicolas. «Les arts visuels sous le signe de l’engagement», Le Devoir, August, 25 and 26, 2018.



Geneviève Chevalier was a CALQ artist-in-residence at the Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow, in 2017, the context in which the work was produced. Her work has been exhibited at the Musée régional de Rimouski, the Symposium de Baie-Saint-Paul, the Musée de Lachine, La Chambre Blanche at Manif d’art 7, and the Thames Art Gallery, Ontario. She lives and works in Eastman, Quebec.




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Virginie Laganière, Ex colonie marine Rosa Maltoni Mussolini, Calambrone (Italie), 2018.
Image tirée de la vidéo | Video still
Avec l'aimable permission de l'artiste | Courtesy of the artist

Virginie Laganière
from November 10th 2018 to December 15th 2018

Opening, Saturday, November 10 - 3PM to 6PM

Family Saturdays: November 17 and December 15

In her sustained residency work, Virginie Laganière adopts an attitude akin to that of an anthropological artist, mindful of immersing herself in the material and emotional texture of the spaces she studies. She conducts field work in which architectural structures in need of redefinition reveal an abundance of current and future potentialities. Developed during a stay at Studio du Québec à Rome, Le Prisme furthers this endeavour by dwelling on the formal and ideological universe of the colonie marine, or Italian seaside colonies.

In the first period of their existence, beginning in the mid nineteenth century, these colonies were health-care facilities meant for children with TB. Ideally located on the coast, their tended cure was based on the purported benefits of sunlight and saline air. Under Mussolini’s reign, their purpose shifts toward indoctrination as they take on the aspect of somewhat militaristic summer camps. Often borrowing from the stylistic vocabulary of the ocean liner and deeply influenced by modernist architectural principles, the imposing buildings convey Party values and constitute veritable spatial instruments for influencing children’s behaviour. After World War II, the seaside colonies eventually establish a pedagogical vocation aiming to promote individual and collective emancipation through non-hierarchical learning activities. Some, in fact, have since been transformed into schools. Most, however, are in a state of neglect, still overlooking the sea, their great carcases strangely punctuating the landscape around seaside towns.

Juxtaposing documentary and fictional fragments, Laganière proposes a free interpretation of the legacies of these heterotopias. Arranged with photographs, videos, low reliefs, small constructions, and even a light, aromatic mist, the exhibition space creates a total environment inspired by what the seaside colonies had once been. The outcome is less a commentary on their controversial past than a subtle look at current issues, in particular with respect to the practices of mass tourism: the accelerated privatization of the coastline and the impact of massive summertime migrations on local communities.

Author: Josianne Poirier

Josianne Poirier is a doctoral student in art history. Her research concerns the fantastical nature of city lights.

PRESS RELEASE (pdf)


PRESS REVIEW

MAVRIKAKIS, Nicolas. «Les arts visuels sous le signe de l’engagement», Le Devoir, August 25 and 26, 2018.



With an MFA from UQAM, Virgine Laganière lives and works in Montreal. Her works have been exhibited in Canada, Mexico, Spain, Finland, Japan, and Switzerland. In winter 2019, partnering with Jean-Maxime Dufresne, she will take part in a group exhibition presented at Gallery de l’UQAM.




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Virginie Laganière
Le Prisme, 2018.
Livre d’artiste.
Avec l'aimable permission de l'artiste | The Prism, 2018. Artist's book. Courtesy of the artist

Le Prisme, livre d'artiste de Virginie Laganière | The Prism, artist's book of Virginie Laganière
from November 10th 2018 to December 15th 2018
Publication available at OPTICA

The Italian colonie marine—or seaside colonies, children’s summer camps set up along the Italian coasts—whose origins go back to the middle of the 19th century, were once established as institutions dedicated to children’s physical and “spiritual” health. These heterotopias functioned on the fringes of society, yet were configured as full-fledged instruments of control. Geographically positioned on the periphery of inhabited areas—before urban sprawl and the development of coastal tourism—they had their own regulations and value systems. The maritime cures took place during a summer vacation, in which the children, removed from the familial cocoon, would live in a geographic, social, and architectural environment framed by the horizon and set to a different temporality. From a historical point of view, the seaside colonies fall into three main periods: the seaside hospices, the Fascist colonies, and the pedagogical colonies.

Virginie Laganière
The Prism, 2018
Artist' book, $10
ISBN 978-2-9817858-0-0
© Virginie Laganière

The publication, produced in collaboration with the TagTeam studio, is composed of three booklets each corresponding to a period of the Italian marine colonies (60 pages). It includes text and images of the artist..




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Geneviève Chevalier
Bord d’attaque/ Bord de fuite, 2018.
Livre d’artiste.
Avec l'aimable permission de l'artiste | Leading Edge/ Trailing Edge, 2018. Artist's book. Courtesy of the artist

Bord d’attaque/ Bord de fuite, livre d'artiste de Geneviève Chevalier | Leading Edge/ Trailing Edge, artist's book of Geneviève Chevalier
from November 10th 2018 to December 15th 2018
Publication available at OPTICA

While filming and sound recording in Scotland (Ailsa Craig, Bass Rock, Isle of May, Outer Hebrides, Troup Head) during a residency at the Centre for Contemporary Arts in Glasgow, and in Eastern Quebec (Parc national de l’Île-Bonaventure-et-du-Rocher-Percé, Parc national Forillon), I became interested in the North Sea and North Atlantic Seabirds. The video Leading Edge / Trailing Edge loosely evokes, through seascapes, portraits of birds and recent scientific data, the actual situation of boreal seabird species, in the era of climate change.

Geneviève Chevalier
Leading Edge/ Trailing Edge, 2018
Artist’s book
$20
ISBN 978-1-7752726-0-1
© Geneviève Chevalier

A book produced in collaboration with Principal Studio, presents a series of booklets showing photographs of birds and landscapes, as well as specimens and images from scientific collections and scientific publications.




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Esther B., Sans titre, 2018. Photographie numérique, taille variable. | Digital Photography, variable size.

Les Samedis ensemble en familles | Saturdays with the Family
from November 17th 2018 to December 15th 2018
Trekking with the Birds! Around the work of Geneviève Chevalier

Geneviève Chevalier’s Trailing Edge/ Leading Edge looks at how climate change threatens the survival of seabirds. In this collage workshop, we will look at different birds form North America and explore the theme of migration. Where do they go, where do they come from? We will create a collaborative artwork tracing different trajectories, from those of birds to our own.

Practical Information
November 17, 2018
December 15, 2018
1 PM to 4 PM

The workshop is open to the whole family and will run continually. Feel free to join in at any time.
Free | No reservation required
For children aged 4 and older
Duration: up to 1 hour and 15 min.

NEW: also offered in Spanish and Portuguese




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Geneviève Chevalier, Bord d'attaque / Bord de fuite - Leading Edge / Trailing Edge, 2018. Image tirée de la vidéo, dimensions variables. | Video Still, variable size. Avec l'aimable permission de l'artiste | Courtesy of the artist


from December 1st 2018 to December 1st 2018
Public Conversation at OPTICA, Saturday, December 1st- 3 pm to 4:30 pm

Public conversation at OPTICA, Saturday December 1st, 3 pm to 4:30 pm between Geneviève Chevalier, *Bénédicte Ramade, art historian, Université de Montréal, and **Kyle Elliott, Assistant Professor; Canada Research Chair (Tier II) Chair in Arctic Ecology, McGill University.

*Bénédicte Ramade is an art historian specialized in ecological questions. She is currently conducting research on the anthropocenization of knowledge and art practices. She is an independent curator and art critic and a lecturer at Université de Montréal.

**Kyle Elliott received his PhD in 2014 from the University of Manitoba, where he was a Vanier Scholar and Garfield-Weston Fellow. He received his two BSc’s in Physics & Math and Conservation Biology from UBC, followed by a MSc at the University of Manitoba. He completed NSERC postdoctoral research at the University of Western Ontario and the University of Guelph prior to starting at McGill in 2015. Kyle recently received the Ned Johnston Young Investigator Award from the American Ornithologists Union. He serves on the board of the Society of Canadian Ornithologists and on the Editorial Board of the Marine Ecology Progress Series. He has conducted research on four continents from the Amazon to the Arctic, but specializes in the Canadian Arctic where he has studied birds on 14 of the islands in the Canadian Archipelago over the past 15 years. The sustainability of Arctic communities depends on their access to clean and abundant food, which is the subject of Dr. Elliott’s research at McGill.




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Juan Ortiz-Apuy, La Guaria Morada, 2016. Humidificateur industriel, déshumidificateurs, peinture Skylla, orchidées Guaria Morada (aka la fleur nationale du Costa Rica), éclairage et système de chauffage, dimensions variables | Industrial mist humidifier, dehumidifiers, Skylla paint, Guaria Morada Orchids (aka the national flower of Costa Rica), lighting and heating systems, dimensions variable. Avec l'aimable permission de l'artiste | Courtesy of the artist

Juan Ortiz-Apuy
from January 19th 2019 to March 16th 2019

Juan Ortiz-Apuy’s exhibition La Guaria Morada uses tropical orchids, dehumidifiers, and an ultrasound industrial humidifier to create an artificial environment in a constant state of negotiation and precariousness. Centred on Costa Rica’s national flower, the installation—a truly fragile ecosystem—refers to the artist’s home country and to situations caught in conditions as uncertain as they are vulnerable. Dependent on gallery lighting and the staff required for its maintenance, the orchids are like art objects, which are maintained by systems that favour and sustain artistic practices.




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Léa Moison, Traduction 1, 2016. Impression 3D de la traduction 1, 12 X 9 X 10 cm.
| 3D Print from the translation 1, 12 X 9 X 10 cm. Avec l'aimable permission de l'artiste | Courtesy of the artist

Léa Moison
from January 19th 2019 to March 16th 2019

As part of the exhibition 25/09=1, Léa Moison is presenting a set of drawings and sculptures produced through 3D modelling and derived from protocols and systems that attempt to translate sound three-dimensionally. Each piece derives from a data transfer process following a series of relays from one discipline to another, according to a well-defined system of equivalencies; thus, music becomes a score, which becomes a drawing, which becomes an object, which becomes music, and so on. Moison attempts to recreate an ethereal universe, almost non-existent, unreal, a dreamlike mood that comes from her playing with the codes of virtual reality.




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Pavitra Wickramasinghe, Studio Experiment, 2013. Photographie numérique, dimension variable. Avec l’aimable permission de l’artiste. | Digital photography, variable size. Courtesy of the artist

Théâtre d’ombres avec Pavitra Wickramansinghe | Shadows theater with Pavitra Wickramansinghe
from February 1st 2019 to April 30th 2019
NEW! Satellite project with the little ones at La Sourithèque

La Sourithèque day-care centre, Centre-Sud district
Spring 2019

This satellite project—off OPTICA’s premises—is jointly produced with artist Pavitra Wickramnasinghe. Children from the La Sourithèque will help create a collective kinetic work, a fantastical shadow play temporarily set up in their own environment. The project is an invitation to a journey, an encounter with the other, and aims to help kids discover their friends’ cultures.

Théâtre d’ombres receives support from the Foundation of Greater Montreal as part of the 2018 Community Initiatives program, which follows the United Nations’ sustainable development objectives.

www.souritheque.com

OPTICA's educational program is supported by the Foundation of Greater Montreal, Community Initiatives Program 2018, and the Caisse Populaire Desjardins du Plateau-Mont-Royal.




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Adam Basanta, A Large Inscription / A Great Noise, 2018. Installations sonores cinétiques. Médium mixte. | Kinetic sound installations. Mixed media. Photo: Emily Gan. Avec l'aimable permission de l'artiste | Courtesy of the artist

Adam Basanta
from April 13th 2019 to June 15th 2019

Adam Basanta’s solo exhibition, A Large Inscription / A Great Noise, brings together two kinetic sound installations featuring automated microphones that attempt to draw a circle on the gravel-covered ground. By the same token, Basanta suggests a reflection on the circle, a major natural form without beginning or end. Each work articulates a tension between the conceptual origin of the circle, as perfect geometric form, and its material limitations. The gallery will thus be occupied by imperfect circular traces left by automatons that produce textured, ambient sound.




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Jo-Anne Balcaen, David Zwirner, Tuesday, January 13, 2015, 4:32 pm, 2015. Photographie numérique, 40,64 x 50, 8 cm. | Digital Photography, 40,64 x 50, 8 cm. Avec l'aimable permission de l'artiste | Courtesy of the artist

Jo-Anne Balcaen
from April 13th 2019 to June 15th 2019

With Dynamique interne/ Internal Dynamics, Jo-Anne Balcaen presents a series of photographs produced during a six-month residency in New York in 2014-2015. Balcaen proposes a critical analysis of the art system and of the homogeneousness of commercial New York gallery spaces. Appropriating the spaces, she aim to capture what lies behind the institutional curtain: the interior snapshots attempt to show the opacity of the machinery behind the art world, hidden aspects of gallery work, the power relationships. Each photograph stages the physical and psychological barriers between the gallery’s public space and its restricted areas: office entrances, blocked hallways, and doors marked “PRIVATE.”